Brexit – A Bit Of A Shocker

I woke up to the shocking news that Britain had voted to exit the EU and David Cameron is to step down.

I guess fear won. It appears from polls that young people wanted to remain but older people voted to leave. Northern Ireland and Scotland voted to stay.

As Fintan O’Toole stated in The Irish Times:

Other than the second World War it is hard to think of a great event in history that functions as a source of uncontested national pride for contemporary English people.

As for an elite in waiting, the English nationalist movement certainly has one. But the handover of elite power that will accompany this particular national revolution will surely be the most intimate in history: from one set of public-school and Oxbridge Tories to another.

And this elite’s vision of a future society seems to come down to the same lump of money – the (dishonestly) alleged £350 million a week that will be saved by leaving the EU – being spent over and over on everything from the National Health Service to farm subsidies. Plus, of course, fewer immigrants creating some kind of imaginary Lebensraum.

There is no attempt to articulate any set of social principles by which the new England might govern itself. As the English social critic Johnny Rotten put it once, “There is no future in England’s dreaming.”

The English are as entitled to their nationalism as anyone else. But nationalism, when it comes down to it, is about them and us. The Brexiters seem pretty clear about them: Brussels bureaucrats and immigrants. It’s just the us bit that they haven’t quite worked out yet. To be ready for self-government they might need to have given that a little more thought.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

10 Responses to Brexit – A Bit Of A Shocker

  1. Yowza! Who’d a thought someone else would shake up the world before our seeming fiasco could? I think we got Trumped!

  2. irishgirl999 says:

    This is trending.

  3. uberduck says:

    Today the UK, tomorrow Texas? We can only hope. But seriously, this really doesn’t seem like good news, but a weird twist of Trumpism gone international. I can just hear someone saying, “let’s make the UK great again!”

  4. 40Watt says:

    I’m gutted.

    “As for an elite in waiting, the English nationalist movement certainly has one. But the handover of elite power that will accompany this particular national revolution will surely be the most intimate in history: from one set of public-school and Oxbridge Tories to another.”

    I think this is something not well understood in the US and only too well understood by some of us with personal experience of how that works – the Scots for example. 😉

  5. 40Watt says:

    “Britain awoke today a poorer, crueller and more dangerous country.”

    UK’s EU workers react to Brexit. For example: Seamas O’Reilly, 30, is Irish and lives in London

    O’Reilly is saddened by the result. “It represents a shameful retreat to a smaller mindset, unshackled from empathy, decency or even just intellectual engagement with complex issues,” he says.

    “I am disgusted by this result and the mandate it gives to the most loathsome political elements of this nation. I am saddened by what it says about the British people, what it means for the protection of essential services and workers’ rights, and the truly horrifying implications that the reimposition of military borders could have on the streets of Northern Ireland.”

    Much more – http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2016/jun/24/europeans-in-uk-react-to-brexit-britain-poorer-crueller

    • irishgirl999 says:

      The imposition of borders will have us back in “The Troubles.”

      • Tumbleweed1 says:

        I was reading in the last few days that it would be a close vote, but I really didn’t think this would be the end result. The ramifications could be catastrophic.

        I am stunned that this happened.

  6. ProfessorCanine says:

    Watermelon carving.

  7. irishgirl999 says:

    The shock decision by the British people to leave the European Union is likely to cost the Irish Government as much as €3.2bn, the Irish Examiner can reveal.

    Financial markets across the globe plunged yesterday in the wake of the result, which led to the resignation of Prime Minister David Cameron, who advocated for Britain to remain in the EU.

    Britain voted to leave by a margin of 52% to 48%.

    Here, business and political leaders were united in their disappointment and expressed concern at what the victory for the Leave campaign will mean for Ireland.

    In the wake of the result’s confirmation, Taoiseach Enda Kenny convened an emergency Cabinet meeting and the Dáil will convene on Monday to debate the implications of the referendum.

    The Government published a series of contingency plans to deal with the Brexit result in a bid to calm the crisis.

    At his press conference, Mr Kenny said Ireland will take some “breathing space” in order to consider the result.

    Ministers and government figures confirmed the potential cost of Brexit is about 2% of Ireland’s GDP, which would equate to €3.2bn.

    http://www.irishexaminer.com/ireland/brexit-likely-to-cost-irish-government-32bn-406956.html

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s