No Excessive Force By The Baltimore Police???

Another video of the arrest of Freddie Gray has surfaced.

Courtesy of The Baltimore Sun:

Kevin Moore was asleep in his home the morning of April 12, when his uncle yelled to him: “The police are tazing Freddie.”

Moore, 28, ran out of his home in the same Gilmor Homes complex where Freddie Gray was arrested and sprinted across the street to get a view of what was happening…

Moore said he found his friend handcuffed, “screaming for his life,” and planted face down on the ground with one Baltimore bicycle police officer’s knee on his neck and the other bicycle officer bending his legs backward so that Gray’s heels were in his back .

“They had him folded up like he was a crab or a piece of origami. He was all bent up,” Moore said.

no legsno legs 27

Freddie’s legs are nowhere to be seen and he is screaming in agony.

no legs2Another officer arrives and the two bike officers can be seen getting up off Freddie.

no legs3For the first time we see Freddie’s legs.

no legs36no legs44no legs6

When police went to pick Gray off the ground, Moore said his friend had limp legs. His cell phone videoshows police carrying Gray to the van, his legs dragging behind him. Gray appears to briefly stand on one leg just before entering the van.

After police loaded him into the van on Presbury Street and drove off, they stopped one block away at Mount and Baker streets to re-restrain Gray with leg irons. Moore said he heard Gray screaming again at that time and raced down the block to get more footage, but by that time, a crowd of police had surrounded the van.

“I didn’t see any movement,” Moore said. “I saw his body but he wasn’t moving.”

“He didn’t put himself in a coma. He didn’t fracture or crack three of his own vertebrae,” Moore said. “He didn’t sever his own spine.”

I think this new video shows ample evidence of excessive force. Freddie was handcuffed. He didn’t need a police officer to force his legs halfway up his back.  He wasn’t resisting and was in extreme pain. I hope the video goes viral and these *policemen* get what they deserve.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

7 Responses to No Excessive Force By The Baltimore Police???

  1. 40Watt says:

    The late Clarence Mitchell Jr. was dubbed ”the 101st senator” for his exemplary work as NAACP Washington lobbyist. His wife, Juanita, the first black woman to practice law in Maryland, was an NAACP activist in her own right. Also included in the collection are the papers of Juanita Mitchell’s mother, Lillie Carroll Jackson, local NAACP president in the 1930s and 1940s, and Parren Mitchell, who was elected Maryland’s first black congressman in 1970 and retired in 1986.

    Former state senator Michael B. Mitchell, the Mitchells’ son, who is handling the donation of the papers, says the papers show that the modern civil-rights movement didn’t begin with the Montgomery, Ala., bus boycott. Baltimore was the hub of the civil-rights movement, starting after Reconstruction, he says.

    http://articles.baltimoresun.com/1995-04-15/news/1995105027_1_clarence-mitchell-mitchell-papers-juanita

    I was about to write about this yesterday, but I didn’t want to inject myself into the story. However, I think it’s important people know about the history of civil rights in Baltimore.

    When I first came to the US in the 60s, lost and very homesick, the Mitchell’s welcomed me into their home, amongst their extended family – Keiffer, Clarence and Uncle Parren – and enveloped me in warmth and kindness. I learned about the civil rights movement from the side of those fighting for their rights. I have never been able to think about them without having tears in my eyes because of the gratitude I feel. Now I have tears because my heart is breaking.

    You can find out more here – http://www.amistadresearchcenter.org/archon/?p=creators/creator&id=191

    • 40Watt says:

      I am making this 2 posts as it’s getting long.

      Juanita Jackson Mitchell was described as the “matriarch of one of Baltimore’s oldest civil rights families.” http://msa.maryland.gov/megafile/msa/speccol/sc3500/sc3520/002300/002306/html/2306bio.html

      I saw her as the mentor of so many young people who were inspired to go to law school in order to change the status quo from the inside, young folk whose mothers and fathers were working day and night to give their children the chance. Everyone I met was dedicated to MLK’s processes of non-violence.

      Then he was assassinated. This is “young” Clarence speaking:

      “I got back to Baltimore that evening. I was driving from the White House and I went through 14th Street, I went through the Black community in D.C., and fires were breaking out,” Mitchell remembered. “Folks were battling – kicking out windows – that sort of thing. As I was driving into Baltimore, the same thing was beginning to occur there. I drove over on Pennsylvania Avenue and I drove over to East Baltimore and there were quite a few people in the streets. This was the beginning of something that was very detrimental and my concern was for the people.” Mitchell and his uncle Parren Mitchell were among many Black elected officials who hit the streets in Baltimore trying to quell the destruction and confronting rioters face to face.

      “We were out there day and night, basically talking to people trying to persuade them to stay off the streets and stop the destruction because all of the destruction was taking place in our community,” Mitchell said.

      Mitchell says that he and his uncle were able to dissuade many of those bent on destruction because they were not strangers to their community. “Basically, they were compliant because we had been out in the streets when there were no riots – they they weren’t seeing us for the first time,” Mitchell said.

      Clarence Mitchell III
      – King of the Streets –
      helped quell violence

      http://archives.ubalt.edu/bsr/archival-resources/documents/afro-40-years.pdf

      We cannot go backwards. I don’t know the answer but I did see, first hand, what leadership is. It’s time for all of us to do this again, together.

    • irishgirl999 says:

      40Watt, I remember you telling me that story when I visited you. I had somehow forgotten that it was in Baltimore. It makes it all the more poignant. What would the Mitchells think now? It has been increasingly shown over the last few years that the black community in Baltimore and the rest of the country have no civil rights.

      I don’t know why this particular killing of a black man has gripped me. So many have happened and been videoed recently, and I have done a number of posts on them. This is not the first. Maybe, subconsciously, all of our connections have surfaced?

      The sheer brutality of the policemen’s actions has sickened me to the core. I make myself watch those videos and enlarge the screenshots in the hope that it will help to put away the real criminals. It is not easy to watch Freddie Gray writhing in agony as two officers contort his body into positions that are horrifying. I find my stomach churning and my anger burning, and then I have to go out and do some gardening to take my mind from it.

      Kevin Moore is also a hero here. He videoed the torture that those terrorists visited on Freddie. I’m sure he was, and is in danger.

      I still don’t hold out much hope that it will change anything but we can not sit idly by and do nothing.

  2. ProfessorCanine says:

    The Baltimore cops like to beat people regularly….
    http://data.baltimoresun.com/news/police-settlements/

    • Moles says:

      It”s as though the thought of prosecution never crosses the minds of these police; that there is a built in protection clause that stops them from ever being held accountable for the appalling actions they commit against people. You’d think that publication of videos showing what these thugs are doing might slow them down or at least make them stop and think before breaking someones’ neck. Apparently not. I think only a conviction and jail time will register with these knuckle draggers.

      • ProfessorCanine says:

        “that there is a built in protection clause that stops them from ever being held accountable for the appalling actions they commit against people.”

        Kinda sorta,yeah…..

        “The officers who were directly involved because of our Law Enforcement Officer’s Bill of Rights we have yet to fully engage those officers, and we will get to the bottom of it,” the mayor said. “I am determined to make sure that we have as full investigation and we follow all of the rules and procedures so if there is a finding of wrongdoing that we have done everything possible to protect policy and procedures so we can hold those individual accountable.”

        https://news.vice.com/article/police-officer-bill-of-rights-blamed-for-baltimores-information-blackout-in-case-of-freddie-grays-severed-spine

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s